TUMMY TICKLING YUMMY TIME?
A 22-year-old man tried to smuggle 207 pounds of dried caterpillars through customs at Gatwick Airport in England. Reportedly, this fellow claimed he was going to use them for “food” and “personal consumption.” (https://www.ibtimes.com/why-did-man-try-smuggle-dried-caterpillars-africa-london-airport-1109065)
OUCH!
Ever hear of a medical procedure called hemiglossectomy? It means to remove part of the tongue. In the 6th century B.C., physicians thought the tip of the tongue caused stuttering, so they’d cut that tip off, causing some patients to bleed to death. (https://www.health24.com/News/7-of-the-most-bizarre-medical-treatments-20171103)
CARE TO “GET A BUZZ ON”?
Ever considered maggot therapy? This involves the use of live fly larvae to help cure wounds and infections. According to sources, maggots were used long ago by the Mayan Indians and Australian aborigine tribes. And, maggot therapy is still occasionally used, especially in the cases of diabetics who have foot ulcers. (https://www.health24.com/News/7-of-the-most-bizarre-medical-treatments-20171103)
AND, IT COST THEM 53 CENTS
In 1914, 5-year-old May Pierstorff was sent from Grangeville, Idaho to visit her grandmother in Lewiston, Idaho. But, instead of buying a ticket, Pierstorff’s parents sent here through the U.S. mail. And, upon arrival in Lewiston, the postmaster personally delivered the young girl to her grandmother’s house. (http://mentalfloss.com/article/53334/6-bizarre-items-mailed-through-us-postal-system)
WHAT ABOUT FLOORING?
The largest thing ever sent by mail was a pre-constructed building. In 1916, William H. Coltharp decided to construct a new bank in Vernal, Utah. Knowing it was impossible to send a completed building through the mail, and wanting the best bricks possible, he sent them from the Salt Lake Pressed Brick Company— all 80,000 of them, stacked and packed inside some 40 large crates. (http://mentalfloss.com/article/53334/6-bizarre-items-mailed-through-us-postal-system)
WHY NOT “HAND DELIVER”?
In November 1958, the most expensive item to be shipped my mail was the allegedly cursed Hope Diamond. Harry Winston donated this diamond to the Smithsonian Institution for the National Jewel Collection. Valued at over $1 million (inflation adjusted $8,680,000 in 2018), the diamond was shipped to the museum for only $145.29, which was mostly package insurance for the precious gem. (http://mentalfloss.com/article/53334/6-bizarre-items-mailed-through-us-postal-system)
NO “‘BLANKEY” FOR CHRIST? Many believe Italy's Shroud of Turin is the burial shroud of Jesus, though there's compelling evidence that shroud is a hoax. Evidence includes Carbon dating proving it was created 14 centuries after Christ was crucified. (https://www.livescience.com/23609-religious-hoaxes.html)
A FORTY DAY FRAUD
Looking for proof of events in the Bible, some claim they’ve found Noah's Ark in Turkey. One was George Jammal, who convinced CBS television to run a two-hour primetime special - "The Incredible Discovery of Noah's Ark." As proof, he displayed a piece of wood from the ark; which turned out to be scrap pine marinated in soy sauce. In fact, Jammal had never been to Turkey. (https://www.livescience.com/23609-religious-hoaxes.html)
HE SHOULD BE IN JAIL
One of the most prominent televangelists in the 1980s was Peter Popoff, who, during his services and revivals, called out names and home addresses of audience members he'd never met, claiming God spoke to him. Truth is, Popoff was wearing an “earpiece” so his wife (who’d spoken earlier to the audience) could short-wave that information to him. (FYI – he still preaches today.) (https://www.livescience.com/23609-religious-hoaxes.html)
BIGOTRY COMES IN MANY FORMS
You wear blue jeans? In North Korea it’s against the law; you’d probably wear black ones. That’s because the color blue is associated with the United States, meaning North Korea doesn’t allow them. (https://www.rd.com/culture/things-banned-around-world/)